Word 2013 Document to a Picture Using PowerPoint 2013

frustrated-work-293jt042412I am frequently asked to update our school website with flyers and pictures of upcoming events.  Since I’m using Sharepoint 2010, I either need the items to load as a PDF or some sort of picture file (jpeg, png, gif, etc.) in order for those outside of our organization to view and download items.  Many of our teachers and staff create really cute flyers using Microsoft Word 2013, so I typically just save them as PDFs to upload and share in a document library.  However, there are those times when we want the actual flyer to appear as a picture on our site.  And currently, none of the image formats are options in the Word 2013 Save As list. Uggh!

Google searches have been really handy in locating a wide range of solutions, but I stumbled upon another solution completely by accident the other day and thought I’d share with the eduverse.  Here’s what I did:

  • Open a blank new slideshow in PowerPoint 2013.
  • Click the Insert tab, then select Object (it’s in the Text group).
  • Once that opens, select Create from File and browse to your Word document.  Got it?  Click Ok.
  • Now, right click on the Word doc in the slide and select Save As Picture.
  • Voila!  You now have an image file of your document.

This may have been the hard way, but it works for me every time.  Do you know of an easier way?  Comment below or on Twitter @thetechladyblog.

Happy Tech-ing!

OneNote Staff Notebook – Lessons Learned, Part 1

In this post, I shared my attempt at using the OneNote Staff Notebook for technology professional development.  The experience was an eye opener for me, mostly because there were a few logistical issues that I hadn’t thought about.  As I reviewed last week’s experiences, I made notes on a few ways to tweak the process going forward.  Here’s what I found – use what you can and toss the rest!

    • Start with a face to face session.  Instead of simply sending out an email that pointed teachers to the task in their OneNote Staff Notebook,  I should have had a whole group session showing teachers what to do, then allow those who are independent learners to complete the tasks at their own pace.  Teachers didn’t know how to get to their notebooks any other way except from my email and once they deleted it, they were lost.  So funny how many teachers responded with “What’s due?!”  when I sent out deadline reminder.
    • Modify tabs before you share.  When you open the notebook, the sections you see are Welcome, the Collaboration Space, and Content Library.  Each of those have generic info created by Microsoft, and it’s not obvious where teachers should look for their own content.  I streamlined the info so it was a little less confusing.
    • Add explanation of tabs and sections.  I went in and modified tab names and created a page in Welcome section that explained each item they saw across the top, as well as the tabs in their own notebooks.  (See my example below) I also put tip on how to see sections that were not showing up.

onenote sample

    • Create a few generic comments and modify as needed.  It was easy to personalize when only handful had completed session, but became harder to do when 50 – 60 had completed assignments!  I was able to copy and paste my generic comment and make changes, which saved me a tone of time.  I also found these really cute QR Codes by Heather Kaiser on Teachers Pay Teachers to use.
    • History feature is even more awesome than I thought!  I panicked for a second when I started thinking about how to monitor the completion of multi-level tasks by the 50+ teachers whom I had made users of the notebook.  Thank goodness for History!  Not only does it allow me to decide the timeframe in which I need to review changes, but it places the name of all users who have made modifications in bold text.  It even bolds the section of their individual notebook they worked on!Well, there you have it.  I’m sure there are many other things I haven’t even come across yet, but I’ll gladly share as I go.  What lessons have you learned using OneNote Staff Notebooks?Happy Tech-ing!

OneNote Staff Notebook

staff dev word cloud Recently, I created my first OneNote Staff Notebook. I’ve been a personaluser of OneNote for years, but this tool allows the facilitator to create a master notebook with pre-determined sections for users as a powerful collaboration tool. Once I learned about the Staff Notebook, I decided to use it as a tool to deliver our technology professional development for the upcoming school year. After creating the notebook, I was able to add each staff member and a co-owner of the notebook (my lovely media specialist!) and share via a link in OneDrive.  You can practice using OneNote Staff Notebooks with this interactive guide.

I selected a few teachers to pilot the notebook first so that we could get a sense of the interaction on both the facilitator’s side and the user side. I was impressed, to say the least. My initial concern was how to know which teachers had actually completed the task.   I found that I was able to go in and use the History feature to see the edits to any pages within the notebook. This is especially handy when you have created and are managing notebooks for over 50 people. Viewing the History allowed me to go directly to the pages that had been edited within recent days. I was also able to view edits by author, so I would know exactly who had completed their task and who had not. Brilliant!

Providing feedback was a breeze. I clicked on the page, provided audio feedback, and able to redirect them to other portions of the task that had not yet been completed. Now that the pilot group has tried it out, I will be sharing it with the entire staff next week to complete our PD session on, fittingly, OneNote!

Excited to see how this turns out. Do you use OneNote with your staff? What has been your experience?