Word 2013 Document to a Picture Using PowerPoint 2013

frustrated-work-293jt042412I am frequently asked to update our school website with flyers and pictures of upcoming events.  Since I’m using Sharepoint 2010, I either need the items to load as a PDF or some sort of picture file (jpeg, png, gif, etc.) in order for those outside of our organization to view and download items.  Many of our teachers and staff create really cute flyers using Microsoft Word 2013, so I typically just save them as PDFs to upload and share in a document library.  However, there are those times when we want the actual flyer to appear as a picture on our site.  And currently, none of the image formats are options in the Word 2013 Save As list. Uggh!

Google searches have been really handy in locating a wide range of solutions, but I stumbled upon another solution completely by accident the other day and thought I’d share with the eduverse.  Here’s what I did:

  • Open a blank new slideshow in PowerPoint 2013.
  • Click the Insert tab, then select Object (it’s in the Text group).
  • Once that opens, select Create from File and browse to your Word document.  Got it?  Click Ok.
  • Now, right click on the Word doc in the slide and select Save As Picture.
  • Voila!  You now have an image file of your document.

This may have been the hard way, but it works for me every time.  Do you know of an easier way?  Comment below or on Twitter @thetechladyblog.

Happy Tech-ing!

One of Those Days…

Image     Today I did (another)  one of those things that makes me question my abilities as a Tech Specialist.  Typically, it’s small stuff, like mentioning an item in an email and then forgetting to attach the item, or drawing a total blank when asked how to fix a problem that occurs on a daily basis and that I’ve fixed at least a hundred times.

But today’s blunder took the cake.  While making modifications to a list I created for teachers on our portal using Sharepoint 2010 – my favorite program (read I HATE this program!!!),  – I forgot that the Alert feature was enabled.  So, as I worked with a colleague to modify the existing list, I inadvertently sent out emails to all those receiving the alerts for every single item on the list – a whopping 170+ emails!  I probably wouldn’t have even noticed this until tomorrow since I wasn’t really checking emails today, except when I picked up my iPhone, I had 170 new messages!  Imagine my chagrin when, after muttering not so nice words about the culprit of these emails, I realized it was me!  I hastily sent out an apology email to all my coworkers – again, nice work Tech Specialist!  Many of them bounced back because the recipient’s mailboxes were full.

Oops!

Happy Teaching!